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Alan McKinnon – Professor of Logistics

Environmental sustainability: a new priority for logistics managers

This introductory chapter begins by defining logistics and providing some statistics to show the scale of its environmental impact. It notes that companies are increasingly taking account of this impact when assessing the performance of a logistics system or service. There is then a brief historical review of the development of Green Logistics over the past fifty years. This is structured around five broad themes: (i) reducing freight transport externalities (ii) city logistics (iii) reverse logistics (iv) logistics in corporate environmental programmes and (v) green supply chain management. Under each of these headings core literature is reviewed to trace the evolution of research issues, approaches and methods. Table 1.1, for example, lists the major studies of freight rationalization undertaken during the 1990s. The results of more recent surveys of managerial opinion are then presented to try to determine whether the growing interest in Green Logistics reflects a genuine concern for the environment or business rhetoric. On the assumption that the corporate commitment to greening logistics is genuine, the next section examines future environmental scenarios for logistics. This is followed by the introduction of an analytical framework for Green Logistics which maps the inter-relationship between the material output of a country or company and the external costs associated with its logistics operations. This highlights the importance of nine key parameters (shown in Figure 1.2) in defining this relationship. Later chapters in the book focus on each of these parameters. This chapter includes with a brief overview of the book’s contents. 

A copy of this chapter (‘sample chapter’) can be downloaded from: 

http://www.koganpage.com/product/green-logistics-9780749471859


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© Professor Alan McKinnon 2018

Kuehne Logistics University
Hamburg
Germany

contactme@alanmckinnon.co.uk

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© Professor Alan McKinnon 2018

 

Kuehne Logistics University
Hamburg
Germany

 

contactme@alanmckinnon.co.uk

 

Contact me

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Sitemap

Reset cookies

 
Web design by Wordspree