We use cookies on this site, but we don't capture any personal information. View our privacy policy.

What happens if I decline cookies?

If you decline cookies, we will suppress Google Analytics and any future third-party cookies on this site, but please note that the site also uses essential cookies as permitted under the UK's Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations for purposes such as remembering which items you may have selected or opened as you move from page to page.

To reject ALL cookies and continue to use this site, please amend your browser settings, but if you do, please be aware that some parts of the site will not work as intended.

For more information, see our Privacy policy page.

Accept cookies     Decline cookies      Reset     Close

Visit Alan McKinnon's LinkedIn page



Alan McKinnon – Professor of Logistics

Decarbonising the deep-sea container supply chain: the possible contribution of port-centric logistics

It has been claimed that one way of reducing carbon emissions from the deep-sea container supply chain is to locate distribution centres at ports, stuff / unstuff containers there and effectively rationalise hinterland transport. Research in the UK, where this form of port-centric logistics (PCL) is now quite well established, has examined the numerous ways in which it can affect carbon emissions. This paper reports the results of online and interview surveys of shippers on the likely uptake of PCL in the UK. It also summarises the results of spreadsheet modelling of the potential CO2 savings from channelling containerised imports of retail supplies through port-based DCs as opposed to more centrally located facilities. The research has explored four other ways in which PCL can influence carbon emissions, including reductions in empty container movements, an acceleration of container turnarounds, freight modal shift within the hinterland and the accommodation of carbon-efficient slow-steaming within global logistics schedules.   The tentative conclusion is that, on balance, PCL can yield a net carbon reduction, though it will require much wider adoption of the PCL paradigm for it to have much impact of the overall carbon footprint of UK logistics.

 

Download a copy of the paper


© Professor Alan McKinnon 2018

Kuehne Logistics University
Hamburg
Germany

contactme@alanmckinnon.co.uk

Contact me

Privacy policy

Sitemap

Reset cookies

 Web design by Wordspree

 

© Professor Alan McKinnon 2018

 

Kuehne Logistics University
Hamburg
Germany

 

contactme@alanmckinnon.co.uk

 

Contact me

Privacy policy

 

Sitemap

Reset cookies

 
Web design by Wordspree