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Alan McKinnon – Professor of Logistics

Transport infrastructure and logistics property

The research outputs reviewed in this section have a common theme in the physical presence of logistics in the landscape and in the use of transport infrastructure. They should be interest to geographers, regional planners and transport policy makers as well as logistics specialists. The material has been classified into four sub-sections:

The first examines the relationship between logistics and regional development, particularly in peripheral areas. It also provides a logistical perspective on the long-running debate over the contribution of transport infrastructure investment to economic development.

The second sub-section focuses on the adverse effects of traffic congestion on the efficiency and reliability of logistics operations. Unlike much of the research on this topic which considers only the direct, on-the-road costs of congestion, several of the papers here investigate its indirect effects on logistical activities at both ends of a congested trip.

Road tolling is often advocated as a means of managing traffic on congested highways. The papers in this sub-section discuss the imposition of road user charges on trucks not just to relieve congestion but also for tax harmonisation and the internalisation of environmental costs. Several of them relate to the UK government’s controversial plans in 2003-2005 to introduce a very complex and costly Lorry Road User Charging (LRUC) scheme.

The final sub-section sees logistics as both a land use and a sector of the commercial property market.

Click the links on the right (or below if you’re viewing this on a smartphone) for full lists of all resources under the various headings.

© Professor Alan McKinnon 2017

Kuehne Logistics University
Hamburg
Germany

contactme@alanmckinnon.co.uk

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© Professor Alan McKinnon 2017

 

Kuehne Logistics University
Hamburg
Germany

 

contactme@alanmckinnon.co.uk

 

Contact me

Privacy policy

 

Sitemap

Reset cookies

 
Web design by Wordspree