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Alan McKinnon – Professor of Logistics

Retail logistics strategies and systems

The greening of retail logistics
Chapter

McKinnon, A. C. and Edwards, J.B. in: (ed.): Logistics & retail management: Emerging issues and new challenges in the retail supply chain, 4. ed., Kogan Page: London (2014)

Logistical activities are responsible for much of the environmental cost associated with modern retailing. For example, the British Retail Consortium estimates that trucking operations account for 10-15% of total CO2 emissions from retailing in the UK. It is hardly surprising therefore that logistics features prominently in the environmental statements of large retailers.   ...

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Retail logistics in the UK: past, present and future
Paper

Fernie, J, Sparks, L. and. McKinnon, A.C. International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, 38 (11/12): 894-914 (2010)

This paper provides an overview of the logistical transformation of British retailing over the last three decades and discusses the likely challenges that logistics managers will face in the future. It shows how large British retailers seized control of the supply chain and have used logistics as a competitive differentiator. ...

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The consolidation of retail deliveries: its effect on CO2 emissions
Paper

McKinnon, A. C. and Woodburn, A. in Transport Policy, 1 (2): 125-136 (1994)

Over the previous 20 years large British retailers had transformed the system of shop delivery by centralizing inventory at distribution centres and delivering supplies in large consolidated loads. This rationalization of the pattern of delivery received little mention in retailers' environmental policy statements, despite the fact that it is likely to have reduced emissions of carbon dioxide and other pollutants. ...

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The impact of changes in retail distribution on a peripheral region: the case of Scotland
Paper

Fernie, J. and McKinnon, A.C. in International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, 19 (7): 25-32. (1991)

This research examines recent changes in retail distribution and the implications of such changes on the logistical support to stores in Scotland. As increasing volumes of stock are channelled through warehouses controlled by retailers, stock is being centralised in large regional distribution centres (RDCs) serving wide geographical markets. ...

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The development of retail logistics in the UK
Paper

McKinnon, A.C. Position paper prepared for the Retail and Distribution Panel of the UK government’s Technology Foresight Programme, London, 47pp (1996)

Retail logistics is the integrated management of the range of activities required to keep retail outlets adequately replenished with supplies. It is a field in which Britain has gained a strong international reputation, partly as a result of the successful exploitation of new technology over the past twenty years. ...

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The advantages and disadvantages of centralised distribution
Chapter

McKinnon, A.C. in: Retail distribution management: A strategic guide. ed. Fernie, J. Kogan Page, 75-89 (1990)

During the 1970s and 1980s, large UK supermarket chains varied widely in the proportion of supplies they channelled through distribution centres.   Some received almost all their supplies from producers directly into their shops, effectively dispersing inventory at a store level. Others required virtually all suppliers to deliver to distribution centres where they centralised their inventory. ...

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Electronic data interchange in the retail supply chain: the distribution contractor's role
Paper

McKinnon, A.C. International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, 18 (2): 39-42 (1990)

At the time this paper was published, Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) was at an early stage in its development, allowing orders, invoices and other commercial information to be relayed directly between different firms′ computer networks. In retail supply chains the main EDI links were being established between manufacturers and retailers. ...

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Multiple retailers' distribution strategies: effects on patterns of land use and traffic flow
Paper

McKinnon, A. C. in The Planner, 72 (7): 16-20 (1986)

The most conspicuous changes in distribution over the previous 30 years occurred at the retail level. Changes in the supporting logistical systems were just as pronounced though received much less attention. One of the most important logistical developments over this period was the growth in multiple retailers’ involvement in distribution upstream of the shop. ...

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Distributing imported goods to British customers
Paper

McKinnon, A. C. in Retail and Distribution Management, 14(5): 86-91 (1986)

Interest in international physical distribution traditionally focused on the outbound movement of exports. Prior to the publication of this paper little consideration was given to the way in which foreign manufacturers distributed their products in the UK market. In a country with a relatively high level of import penetration like ... ...

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The distribution systems of supermarket chains
Paper

McKinnon, A. C. in Service Industries Journal, 5 (2): 226-238 (1985)

This article considers the benefits supermarket chains can achieve by setting up their own distribution systems and attempts to explain differences in distribution strategies. These differences appear to be closely related to variations in the way chains have grown, their investment priorities, product range, average branch size and geographical extent. ...

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© Professor Alan McKinnon 2017

Kuehne Logistics University
Hamburg
Germany

contactme@alanmckinnon.co.uk

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© Professor Alan McKinnon 2017

 

Kuehne Logistics University
Hamburg
Germany

 

contactme@alanmckinnon.co.uk

 

Contact me

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